An Unfiltered Glance of Carers for Orphans and Vulnerable Children

Blog-Challenge-2016

This entry’s topic for the blogging boot camp challenge: community member profile (aka interviewing someone that resides in my current home).

Interviews are a significant but unwritten part of my current job description. As a health extension volunteer, I frequently interview community members for informal needs assessments as I try to get a grasp on the current situation. Since my service I have coordinated focus groups of teen mothers, people living with HIV, and the largest source of pediatric health knowledge in rural South Africa: Child and Youth Care workers. (CYCWs)

I have the public health context behind South Africa’s response to the HIV epidemic at the end, but for now I will yield to the real expert in my area of Amajuba: a woman who serves as a CYCW for my organization. We did this interview in broken English, so her words are not verbatim (we are working towards an isiZulu tutor, it still may take a while) but I tried to maintain her thoughts with as much of her sentence structure as possible. Take it away inkosazana (fair maiden in isiZulu).

What do you do as a Child and Youth Care Worker (CYCW)?

As a child and youth care worker, I work with children. We do home visits and a lot of primary school visits. We especially support orphans, as many of them are HIV positive.

Who is an orphan in South Africa?

Orphans have both parents’ dead. Usually they live with a gogo/granny. If one parent is alive but they are not present in the child’s life, they are considered OVC (Orphans and Vulnerable Children).

How did you become a CYCW?

Amajuba District started the program last year. Other districts in KZN province have had CYCWs for a while, but my guess is our schools started to overwhelm the government social workers with cases. So they started to train workers at Drop-in-Centres (DICs) who were already working with OVCs directly affected by HIV.

How did you first encounter HIV in the community?

I would say the schools, because HIV is taught in the local schools. Also the local clinic.

What was it like when HIV first came to Amajuba?

It was awful. Many people died before resources were available. However after about 2007 when ARVs (antiretrovirals) and VCT (voluntary counseling and testing) things got better. People are still scared to get testing but peer pressure from the schools, where children talk about their HIV positive family members.

What was our community like before Child and Youth Care Workers?

Not good, because referrals were slow, if there was a concern. The Social Workers did not have the time to investigate the school’s concerns. Now CYCWs can visit the schools and refer if needed. It is much better.

What do you like about being a CYCW?

I love working with children and being a support. The children are too scared to talk to their granny so I play with them. Then they talk to me about their problems.

If you could change one thing about the CYCW program, what would you do?

I would get the government department to try and provide emergency money. Sometimes a child needs food now, and I use my own money for an emergency food parcels.

What do you want Americans to know about South Africa?

We became free but we still suffer.

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Checklist the CYCWs use during home visits

 

 

In the South African context, Home Based Cares (HBC which provides care for people living with HIV/AIDS at their homes) and Drop-in-Centres (DICs places that provide psychosocial, homework, and nutrition support for OVCs directly impacted by the AIDS pandemic or OCVs) were established as the model for the governments delayed response. The history of South Africa’s, the response to AIDS is a tragic story. The first documented deaths in the country connected to AIDS occurred in the early 1980’s, when South Africa was still in the grips of apartheid. In 1994 when apartheid rule dissipated, the government had the tedious task of restructuring the country. Until 2008 government officials denied that AIDS was caused by HIV, and through policy treatments like ARVs were not widely available in the country. The result was that HIV and deaths were rampant in communities. After 2002 the government prioritized the care of HIV positive individuals, increasing lifespan for people living with HIV. Today, South Africa is the nation with the highest population of people living with HIV in the world.

Currently, South Africa is in the midst of an international conversation over the effectiveness of Home Based Care, and funding towards HBC and DICs reflects the changes. The majority of organizations CHOP (Community HIV Outreach Project) PCVS are partnered with are a mixture of HBC and DIC(both of my organizations implement both models). Regardless of their future, these organizations have shaped the communities of rural South Africa for the past decade, helping families heal, grieve, and thrive in the midst of the HIV epidemic.

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One thought on “An Unfiltered Glance of Carers for Orphans and Vulnerable Children

  1. Pingback: Blog Challenge Responses Round Up #6 - Blogging Abroad

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